What’s Intersectionality?

Intersectionality….is exactly how it sounds. It’s the idea that all aspects of our identity intersect, and affect how we experience the world. For example, one aspect of my identity is that I am a woman, while another aspect of my identity is that I’m straight. As a woman, I lack the privilege that comes with being a man in this society, but as straight, I have the privilege of having a sexual orientation that is typically accepted in this society. As a straight woman, I experience the world differently than a bisexual woman, or a straight man, even though we share certain aspects of our identity. Similarly, a straight white woman experiences the world differently than a straight black woman…all of these aspects affect your experience. Something really interesting about my identity is that intersectionality is significant even within my ethnicity- within one singular aspect of my identity. I’m multi-racial- half Egyptian and half Italian. Being Egyptian, a non-white identity, I have to deal with racial discrimination, but being Italian, a white identity, is more accepted and more of a privilege in this society. So even within my own ethnic identity, I experience the world really uniquely as an Egyptian-Italian, straight woman than even just an Egyptian straight woman or an Italian straight woman.

So. many. intersections.

But it’s SO important to take all aspects of identity into consideration, because that intersectionality defines the privileges and/or struggles we face, it defines how we experience the world.

 

First Reherasal!

We had our first rehearsal on Monday! Every Stage Manager knows how exciting it is the first time we move into the official space!

T minus lessthanaweek until our first show! I can’t believe that it’s already been almost 3 weeks! Sheesh.

First Rehearsal!

 

Malcolm

The Cisgender Facebook Option

A cisgender person is someone who identifies as they gender/sex they were assigned at birth. For example, your birth certificate says female, and you identify as a female woman.  - Queer Dictionary

When Facebook added gender option to self-identify as other than “male” and “female,” many probably thought it only applied to those who identify as a non-normative gender identity. However, cisgender is a gender identity, too, and to not put “cisgender” before the gender you identify as is to perpetuate the idea that cisgender is the default, the normal, whereas trans* people are is some way the “other” or “abnormal.” So if you identify as Cisgender, consider adding that to your facebook – because I think it’s a great way to express your allyship. 

I have a bone to pick with Marvel Studios.

galaxy
So I get feministy emails from a movement called The Representation Project, whose mission is to point out gender inequalities in media and hopefully encourage change. (It’s great) ((you should look at it)) ((( http://therepresentationproject.org/ )))
Anyways, I got this email recently:
“Last week, Marvel Studios released the film Guardians of the Galaxy, both to great financial success and widespread accolades for featuring a strong f
emale lead within its cast. So it is troubling that Kevin Feige, President of Marvel Studios, said this week that the studio has no intention of releasing a female-led action film in the foreseeable future. Feige continued by saying the studio is booked with sequels to their already-established franchises - which do not spotlight women’s stories - through 2017.
This is surprising news considering that Guardians of the Galaxy was a box office hit in large part due to women, both involved with the movie and in the audience. Not only does it star Zoe Saldana and Glenn Close, but it also includes Marvel’s first-ever credited female screenwriter, Nicole Perlman.
The result of their work is a film that portrays complex female characters who are valuable beyond just their youth, beauty, and sexuality. Further, Guardians of the Galaxy also grossed over $94 million in its opening weekend (the biggest August opening of all time).[3] Women played a direct role in its financial success – comprising over 44% of the Guardians of the Galaxy audience - the largest female audience M
arvel has ever seen.
So, as Slate reporter Amanda Hess said of Feige’s excuse, even though “[Marvel] can’t make movies with women because they never [have] made movies with women,”[5] it doesn’t justify the systemic underrepresentation of women in action films.     
That’s why this week we’re calling on you to tweet at Marvel Studios to say you don’t want to wait until after 2017 to see a film that stars a strong and complex superheroine whose identity is not defined by her sexuality . Together, we can use our voices to shape the media we want to see, and ensure it includes more diverse and inspirational stories of women.”
So Marvel cares more about making Spiderman 17 than a movie with a female superhero as a lead, or even a woman just having a story at all. The audiences reaction to Guardians of the Galaxy proves that yes, women can care about action movies and can kick ass and help Marvel make a ton of money, but nope…Peter Parker’s story hasn’t been told enough times. There’s no excuses at all anymore. It’s rooted in blatant sexism and it’s tacky and annoying. 

Why we’re awesome (and you are too!)

Every single voice that has touched the Sedehi Diversity Project has helped craft one of the most deeply beautiful and raw experiences of my entire life. When the cast came together to live at Muhlenberg, we were  9 kids who didn’t know each other very well suddenly sharing a living space, funfetti cupcakes, and some of our most vulnerable stories and beliefs. In the past 2 weeks we became a more intimate family than I could have ever conceived of. I have never felt so exposed and so safe in my entire life to talk about Diversity and the intricate ways in which it has shaped each of us as individuals. It is incredible to me that we are all together, only connected by the fact that we a) go to Muhlenberg and b) auditioned for the Diversity Project, and here we are watching Rugrats and Hey Arnold together at 3 in the morning discussing how progressive they are.

So what I want to say about my experience thus far is this. I would never have learned about just how beautiful and complex you are – you being every single person who has worked on this project since the beginning, the current cast of 2014, everyone who has interview with us, and anyone taking the time to read this blog. Your stories matter. They have shaped me and changed the way I view so many aspects of life and I realize more than ever that there is never enough learning when it comes to Diversity. I will never understand it completely. No one ever will. But we’re trying. And that’s why we’re awesome, and you are too.